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Posts for category: ENT

By Ear, Nose, & Throat Associates of Corpus Christ
September 05, 2019
Category: ENT
Tags: Allergies  

Woman sneezing from allergiesYou may have allergies that show up in the spring when plants are flowering and grass is growing. You’ve grown used to the itchy, allergies watery eyes and sneezing. But now, you have allergies in winter too, when you’re indoors because of bad weather. Your ENT specialists want you to know that allergies aren’t just seasonal. They can affect you all year long.

Hay fever, also called allergic rhinitis, is common during the spring and summer months and is caused by an allergic response to tree or grass pollen and various other flowering plants. But allergies aren’t confined to just spring and summer. When you are indoors during the fall and winter, you can experience allergies to pet dander, dust mites, mold and many other indoor irritants. You can also be allergic to certain foods and not even realize it.

Your first step in dealing with allergies is to learn what you are allergic to. Your ENT doctors can test you for food allergies and a variety of both indoor and outdoor allergens. Once you’ve found out what you are allergic to, your doctors may prescribe:

Allergy shots—typically given once a week with either a single injection or multiple injections depending on how many things you are allergic to.

Sublingual drop therapy—a convenient option for people on the go, or those who don’t want injections; your doctors mix up a custom treatment solution which you can take at home and use daily, as a drop under your tongue.

There are also some remedies you can try at home to get relief from allergy symptoms, such as:

  • Irrigating your nasal passages with a saline solution
  • Over-the-counter antihistamines and decongestants
  • Using allergy-proof pillowcases and linens
  • Using allergy or HEPA filters in your house, especially in the bedroom
  • Vacuuming your carpets regularly
  • Keeping your pets off of furniture and out of your bedroom

If you have irritating allergies, you already know they can affect your life. They can keep you from doing the things you like, and worst of all, they may not be just seasonal. But now there’s help just a phone call away from your ENT specialists. Call today and get some relief from your allergies!

By Ear, Nose, & Throat Associates of Corpus Christ
August 19, 2019
Category: ENT
Tags: Sinusitis   Nose   Rhinoplasty  

While a nose job may seem purely cosmetic it actually offers health benefits, as well.

When we hear the words “nose job” we automatically think about the cosmetic enhancement that many people want to improve the shape and rhinoplatsyoverall appearance of their nose; however, there is more than meets the eye when it comes to a rhinoplasty. In fact, this procedure isn’t always cosmetic. Sometimes people need a rhinoplasty to improve their health. Find out when a rhinoplasty may be a necessity rather than just a cosmetic treatment.

Medical Reasons for a Rhinoplasty

One condition that may warrant getting a rhinoplasty is a birth defect known as a cleft lip or cleft palate. This congenital problem can make it challenging for children to eat or get the nutrients they require to grow up big and strong. Because of this, a rhinoplasty is often recommended by an otolaryngologist to correct the defect.

Of course, there are a multitude of conditions and injuries that may require rhinoplasty treatment. If someone has chronic nasal inflammation due to allergies and has severe breathing issues then a rhinoplasty may be the right procedure to improve their breathing.

Injuries or trauma to the nose (e.g. a broken nose) may also necessitate a rhinoplasty to correct the deformation.

Getting Rhinoplasty

Of course, no matter whether this procedure is cosmetic or medically necessary, there are two ways to perform this procedure: an open and a closed rhinoplasty. An open rhinoplasty is when the ENT doctor cuts into the septum to restructure the nose. When an incision is made into the nostrils and performed here this procedure is known as a closed rhinoplasty.

Whether you get an open or closed rhinoplasty will depend on several factors including the goals behind your treatment, any injuries or conditions you want to treat, and the thickness of the skin that we will be working on.

If you want to find out more about whether a rhinoplasty may alleviate your breathing problems then it’s time to talk to an ENT expert who can examine your nose and determine whether you are an ideal candidate.

By Ear, Nose, & Throat Associates of Corpus Christ
August 01, 2019
Category: ENT
Tags: Deviated Septum  

Treating a Deviated Septum

Do you have a deviated septum? A deviated septum is a disorder in which the nasal septum -- the cartilage and bone that separate the right and left nostrils -- is off center or crooked. A deviated septum may be present at birth, may become crooked during fetal development, or may be caused by an injury. Having a deviated septum may cause problems such as nosebleeds or breathing difficulties. If you have a deviated septum, your ear, nose, and throat doctor (ENT) can help. Read on to find out how a deviated septum is treated.

1. Decongestants. If your deviated septum isn't severe, your symptoms may respond to treatment with medications. If you have a deviated septum, your doctor may prescribe decongestants. Decongestants are available as a nasal spray or pill. Decongestants are drugs that reduce nasal tissue inflammation, helping to keep the airways on both sides of the nose open. Medicine only treats the swollen mucus membranes and won't correct a deviated septum.

2. Antihistamines. Antihistamines may be prescribed to relieve symptoms of nasal obstruction by reducing swelling of the nasal membranes. Antihistamines are medicines that that help prevent allergy symptoms, including congestion and runny nose. They can also help nonallergic conditions such as those occurring with a cold. Follow the instructions on the package label or prescription carefully when taking an antihistamine.

3. Nasal Steroid Sprays. Nasal steroid sprays have anti-inflammatory effects and can reduce inflammation in the tissue that lines sinuses and nasal passages, making breathing easier. Your doctor may recommend using a steroid spray once daily. It usually takes from one to three weeks for nasal steroid sprays to reach their maximal effect. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's directions when using them.

4. Surgical Repair. If drug therapies don't work for you, your doctor may recommend surgery to correct your deviated septum (septoplasty). Your doctor may suggest septoplasty to repair your deviated septum. During the procedure, your nasal septum is straightened and repositioned in the center of your nose. The procedure typically takes 1 to 2 hours and uses local or general anesthetic.The level of improvement you can expect with surgery depends on the severity of your deviation.

5. Rhinoplasty. In some cases, rhinoplasty, commonly known as a nose job, is a plastic surgery procedure that is performed to treat a deviated septum. Rhinoplasty involves modifying the cartilage and bone of your nose to change its size or shape or both. Rhinoplasty can be performed using local anesthesia, intravenous sedation, or general anesthesia. Sometimes, the procedure performed at the same time as septoplasty.

Treat yourself to a better life. If you have a deviated septum, find a qualified ENT doctor in your local area and schedule a consultation. ENT doctors have received the proper training and education needed to treat a deviated septum. Treating your deviated septum can help you achieve a better quality of life!

By Ear, Nose, & Throat Associates of Corpus Christ
July 15, 2019
Category: ENT

Do you feel like you’re constantly dealing with a stuffy nose? If so, you certainly aren’t alone. There are many people out there that feel like they can’t breathe properly due to nasal congestion. While this may be a frustrating problem and one that’s challenging to tackle on your own, an otolaryngologist can help you find the relief you need.

The two most common causes of persistent nasal congestion are chronic sinusitis and allergic rhinitis. ENT doctors are seeing more and more patients who are dealing with these conditions. In order to properly treat these conditions you should see an ear, nose and throat specialist who will be able to determine the cause of your symptoms so they can create an effective treatment plan.

What is allergic rhinitis?

If you are someone who is allergic to animal dander, dust or pollen then you may be dealing with allergic rhinitis. Being exposed to these common allergens can lead to inflammation of the nose and sinuses, which can make it difficult to breathe. Allergic rhinitis is a common condition affecting both children and adults in the US. Along with chronic nasal congestion you may also experience a runny nose, postnasal drip, coughing, itchy nose, or sneezing.

Some people experience symptoms all year round while for others their symptoms are seasonal. Seasonal allergies caused by pollen, dust mites, and cockroaches may flare up throughout the year with bouts of remission.

What is chronic sinusitis?

Most people will deal with sinusitis, or sinus infection, at least once during their lifetime; however, sometimes this condition doesn’t go away with simple at-home care and treatment. When symptoms persistent for more than 12 weeks and don’t respond to conservative care then this is considered chronic. The common symptoms of chronic sinusitis include nasal congestion or a blockage, nasal drainage, decreased sense of smell, and facial pressure.

It can be difficult to tell the difference between allergic rhinitis and chronic sinusitis. This is why it’s a good idea to visit an otolaryngologist if you are dealing with persistent nasal congestion that doesn’t go away with at-home care. Both of these conditions can be controlled through lifestyle modifications, prescription medication, minimally invasive procedures, and allergy shots. Your doctor will be able to sit down with you and discuss the different treatment options available to you.

By Ear, Nose, & Throat Associates of Corpus Christ
June 17, 2019
Category: ENT
Tags: Ear Infection  

You woke up with an intense and persistent pain in your ear. All sound is muffled and it feels like your ear is stuffed with cotton. These symptoms are likely due to an ear infection. While ear infections can happen to anyone, children are particularly prone to them. In fact, approximately three out of four children will deal with at least one ear infection by age 3.

An ear infection usually affects the middle ear. This is known as an infection of the otitis media, in which fluid and mucus block the tubes of the ears. This is why you’re having trouble hearing. While it’s easy to be able to describe symptoms you’re experiencing, it isn’t always easy for children, particularly little ones, to be able to tell you that their ear hurts.

So, how can you tell whether or not your child might have an ear infection? You’ll have to look out for:

  • Tugging or pulling at the ear
  • Increased crying, irritability, and fussiness
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Crying when lying down to sleep
  • Balance issues
  • Not hearing or responding to voices or sounds

If your child is displaying these symptoms it’s important to bring them in to see their otolaryngologist who will be able to examine the ear and determine whether there is an infection.

The good news is that many ear infections will go away on their own; however, our ENT doctors understand that sometimes the pain can be severe and unbearable, and you may need something to ease the pain until the infection goes away. We can certainly prescribe the right pain reliever if over-the-counter options aren’t working. In some cases, we may need to prescribe antibiotics to treat the infection.

Even though you may want to wait out an ear infection before bringing your child in, it’s important that you do visit your child’s otolaryngologist as soon as possible if their ear infection is accompanied by:

  • Loss of hearing
  • Discharge or blood coming from the ear
  • High fever
  • Severe drowsiness
  • Stiff neck
  • Nausea and vomiting

If your child is under 6 months old it’s important that you bring them in right away if you suspect that they have an ear infection. Otherwise, children dealing with minor symptoms that are over the age of 6 months old can often be treated with simple at-home care.

If you are unsure whether or not you should bring yourself or your child into the office, give our ENT practice a call and let us know the symptoms. We will be able to determine whether you will need immediate care or whether we should wait a couple days to see if the infection gets better on its own.